September 17th, 2014

daniskatra:

the answer of someone who has thought about it at length

(Source: hiddlestatic, via heyfunniest)

theoneogorbae:

bookoisseur:

wanderingweasleys:

shardwick:

Fun at Weasley’s Wizard Wheezes.

#ActualSiblings

The look on her face.

"I have been dealing with this for 10 years. You don’t even know."

#ActualWeasleys

(via heyfunniest)

trymychokingstyle:

My Mum - 1988Me - 2014

trymychokingstyle:

My Mum - 1988
Me - 2014

(via heyfunniest)

September 16th, 2014

timbuktu-timbuktu-timbuktu:

(for the anon who requested something like this - accidentally deleted your ask!  :P)  

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Oh, a power play. A power play with the most powerful family in Britain. Now that is a dominatrix. Ooh, this is getting rather fun, isn’t it?

Oh, a power play. A power play with the most powerful family in Britain. Now that is a dominatrix. Ooh, this is getting rather fun, isn’t it?

(Source: adleration, via ohgodvause)

(Source: tomhazeldine, via ohgodvause)

September 15th, 2014

Have you ever written/do you know of any meta on the subject of Sherlock's individual morality? Like, do we have any reason to think he felt badly about killing Magnussen, or does the concept of death/murder only matter to him when it's pertaining to a case? I mean he seemed really upset/shocked/scared when Moriarty shot himself in front of him, but does Sherlock even have a strong moral objection to actual MURDER? Hopefully you kinda understand what I'm saying.
Asketh - Anonymous

loudest-subtext-in-television:

It’s going to be a focal point of my upcoming Moriarty meta, oddly. Basically Sherlock is pretty moral, no matter how aloof he acts. You can tell by the cases he selects and how he objects to working for Mycroft on the grounds that Mycroft does things like start wars, his disgust that the government lets people like Moriarty and Magnussen get away with things, etc.

Sherlock can be pushed to kill people but he always tries to avoid it, and he only ever tries to kill or threatens to kill reprehensible people in order to protect others. From the first series onward Sherlock repeatedly saves people’s lives, even putting his own life at risk to help save strangers. In Magnussen’s office he didn’t care about the guard that Mary knocked out because he was a white supremacist, etc.

Sherlock never accepts cases from people if he knows they’re bad people, either. He flies out to Minsk to correct a guy’s grammar and leaves when he finds out he just killed his girlfriend/wife/whatever. He exposes cheaters and frauds in front of people they’re trying to defraud when they come to him. Sherlock has never liked very immoral people and he never helps them, even though he could.

Sherlock’s morality isn’t much different from anyone else’s: he just doesn’t candy coat it when it comes to caring about bad people dying, and he doesn’t bother shedding tears for dead strangers since it won’t do any good. He does, however, bother to bring their killers to justice, and hates seeing criminals get away. What may we deduce about his heart? He’s pretty much just like everyone else.

(Source: scottsmmers, via lehnsherres)

ifsheetswerestates:

Patrick’s story before Grand Theft Autumn at Monumentour in Burgettstown, PA on July 3, 2014.

September 14th, 2014

Is there anything that you are unashamedly fannish about?

(Source: ohgodbenny, via cumberbatchquotes)